There are three different patterns:

Pointed - One color darkening at the extremities (nose, ears, tail and paws)


Mitted - Same as pointed, but with white paws and abdomen. With or without a blaze (a white line or spot on the face), but must have a "belly stripe" (white stripe that runs from the chin to the genitals) and a white chin.


Bicolor — White legs, white inverted 'V' on the face, white abdomen and sometimes white patches on the back (Excessive amounts of white, or "high white," on a bicolor is known as the Van pattern, although this doesn't occur nearly as often as the other patterns).

 

Here are some more "technical" facts/statements about Ragdolls:

The Ragdoll is a cat breed with blue eyes and a distinct colorpoint coat. It is a large and muscular semi-longhair cat with a soft and silky coat.[1] Developed by American breeder Ann Baker, it is best known for its docile and placid temperament and affectionate nature. The name "Ragdoll" is derived from the tendency of individuals from the original breeding stock to go limp and relaxed when picked up.

Breed standards describe the Ragdoll as affectionate, intelligent, relaxed in temperament, gentle and easy to handle.

 

Physical characteristics:

The Ragdoll is one of the largest domesticated cat breeds with a sturdy body, large frame and proportionate legs. A fully-grown female weighs from 8 pounds (3.6 kg) to 15 pounds (6.8 kg). Males are substantially larger, ranging from 12 pounds (5.4 kg) to 20 pounds (9.1 kg)[2] or more. The genes for point coloration are also responsible for the blue eyes of the Ragdoll. More intense shades of blue are favored in the show ring. Though the breed has a plush coat, this coat consists mainly of long guard hairs, while the lack of a dense undercoat results in, according to the Cat Fanciers' Association, "reduced shedding and matting."[10] Mitted Ragdolls, which weren't allowed titling until the '08-'09 show season, will often be confused for Birmans. The easiest way to tell the difference is by size (the Ragdoll being obviously larger) and chin color (Ragdolls have white chins, while Birmans have colored chins), although breeders recognize the two by head shape and boning.


Ragdolls come in six different colors - seal, chocolate, flame, and the corresponding "dilutes" such as blue, lilac and cream. This also includes the tortoiseshell pattern in all colors and the three patterns. All Ragdoll kittens are born white. They have good color at 8 – 10 weeks and full color and coat at 3 – 4 years.

 

There are three different patterns:

Pointed - One color darkening at the extremities (nose, ears, tail and paws)


Mitted - Same as pointed, but with white paws and abdomen. With or without a blaze (a white line or spot on the face), but must have a "belly stripe" (white stripe that runs from the chin to the genitals) and a white chin.


Bicolor — White legs, white inverted 'V' on the face, white abdomen and sometimes white patches on the back (Excessive amounts of white, or "high white," on a bicolor is known as the Van pattern, although this doesn't occur nearly as often as the other patterns).

A pointed Ragdoll with darkened extremities.


The mitted pattern is similar to the pointed with the exception of the paws and abdomen.


The white patch of inverted 'V' on the face indicates a bicolor pattern.

 

When you see "Lynx" mentioned, it refers to a striping pattern within the coloration.

 

 

SO WHAT IS A "MINK" ?  

Origination...

 Mink is not a new breed of Ragdoll, not even a new pattern, but rather it is a bloodline which can be traced back to the very first Ragdolls by Ann Baker and other IRCA Ragdoll breeders.  YES, minks are purebred, SBT and TICA registered Ragdolls.  A look at early pedigrees from the Ann Baker cattery, called Raggedy Ann, you will see the names of such Ragdoll cats like Josephine (a solid white) and Buckwheat (a black Burmese type) which confirms this statement.

 

Most breeders choose to continue with traditional Ragdolls only and just a few are continuing with these old lines and breed with Minks.  

 

Genetics and Kittens...

 The Burmese gene is cb which creates a brownish coat for a genetically black cat.  The points (face mask, ears, legs, and tail) are very dark and the rest of the body is richly warm.  The mink gene isn't a separate gene but rather a combination of the pointed gene and the Burmese gene represented by (cbcs).

When you breed two mink cats together you'll get the following results: half of the litter will be mink colored, a quarter will be "sepia" colored (actually this is Burmese color, but they are called "sepia") and a quarter will be pointed Traditional Ragdolls.  This is possible because some kittens will receive the cb gene from both parents which will make them a sepia color, some will get the cs gene from both parents which will make them pointed, and some will get cb from one parent and cs from the other, and so they are mink colored.  Some breeders will tell you that they have kittens that are either: 1/4 mink, 1/2 mink, or 3/4 mink... there's no such thing and it doesn't make sense.  Ask them how do they determine how much mink is in a kitten?  This is just a scam to make more money since minks usually cost more than traditionals... kittens are either 100% traditional, 100% mink, or 100% sepia.

 

Temperament...

 Do Minks still have the same characteristics as the traditional variety of Ragdolls?  Most definitely!  They are a lovely, large, docile, floppy, people-friendly cat.  The Ragdoll cat or kitten does not wish to be left alone, it is a very social creature.  Other than having different markings, an SBT purebred TICA registered mink Ragdoll is exactly that, a true Ragdoll!

 

Physical Characteristics...

 So why is THIS type of Ragdoll named "mink"?  They are called minks because the fur of this type of Ragdoll is still smoother than that of the pointed traditional Ragdoll, which is hardly possible, but they truly feel like a ladies mink stole.

Eye color between the traditional pointed variety and the Mink Ragdoll is also a distinguishing feature of each.  In the traditional Ragdoll kitten, the eye color is always blue.  The Mink Ragdoll has a gorgeous aqua (blue-green) eye coloring, resembling those pictures of the Caribbean Sea. The below photo is a great example of the eye coloring difference between a Mink and a Traditional.

 

Colors & Patterns...

 Mink Ragdoll kittens are born with color, unlike traditional Ragdoll kittens who are born white.  The point color of the mink is much stronger, richer, and darker than that of the traditional Ragdoll.  Mink Ragdolls come in all the traditional colors of seal, blue, chocolate, lilac, flame, cream, tortie, and blue/cream.  They are also available in the traditional patterns of a Ragdoll, such as: colorpoint (having no white), mitted (white mitts on front paws and boots on back legs with white chin and bib), and bicolor (an inverted "V" on its face, white on all legs, chin and bib).  Any of these patterns and colors can also be marked with the lynx in point (tabby markings).

 

(Thanks Wikipedia and friend breeders that helped with the wording)

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